Saturday, 22 February 2014

Candle making from Yankee Candle leftovers!

How many of you, like me, have a tub full of leftover wax from candles that you've burned?
I love Yankee Candles and burn them all the time but I can't bring myself to throw out the last bits left in the jar once the wick has burned through or when I change the scent in the sample burner. I always keep those little bits and I finally got around to making my first candle with the leftovers.
I used an old Yankee candle jar and some wicks I'd bought. I have no knowledge of doing this and I have heard that wax has a flash point whereby it could get messy. I have no idea what that flash point is though so I just got on with remelting the waxes colour by colour.

Here's my little stash
 candle making, yankee candle, diy candle





The melting process was pretty easy, I just boiled some water in a saucepan and then kept it simmering while I dropped a glass bowl in and put the candle wax into the bowl until it had melted through.
Once the wax melted I poured it into the Yankee candle jar and then shoved it in the freezer to set while the next lot of wax was melting in the bowl. The hardest part was keeping the wick upright and centred but once I filled the jar halfway it got much easier.
The finished candle may not look amazing and I assume the fragrance is going to be weak but I kind of enjoyed doing it and may even have a go at making more

 yankee candle, diy candle, candlemaking


Wednesday, 12 February 2014

DIY fireplace mantle

I'm not feeling the crafty love right now - it's just too cold to do anything and all I'm inclined to do right now is sit in the warm front room and browse the tinterweb.

Thought I'd do a post on the fireplace mantle I made for the dining room log burner opening. As usual I used all scrap / salvaged wood and as usual I made it all up as I went along and yes, as usual it went very wrong initially.

The whole piece was made from 8"x2"  and 6" x 2" timber and I made it in a few sections for ease and put it all together in situ.
The mantle is a length of 8x2, well sanded and then stained and given a few coats of satin varnish. The upstands at each end are 6x2 timber given the same treatment as the mantle.
The finials that attach the upstands to the mantle were free drawn onto 6x2 timber. I cut four of them out using a jigsaw (with a dodgy blade I might add) and then I glued and clamped them together in pairs to get the chunky look I wanted.
Initially I was looking for a way to put them all together in situ but Mr CH decided (while I was away) that he would attach the upstands to the wall using 'sticks like s**t' - what a stupid idea! The finials had already been attached to the upstands via screws at the back so all that was left was to attach the mantle which Mr CH yet again decided would be fine using 'sticks like s**t'.
The whole thing looked smashing....................for a week or so! Then the wood started to warp from the heat of the log burner and as the only thing holding it together was hubbys stupid 'sticks like s**t' there was nothing to control the warp and the whole mantle started to seperate.
Eventually I decided I couldn't leave it that way so removed the mantle (surprisingly easily - go figure) and replaced with a new length of timber. This time I first screwed a thinner length of timber into the finials and then sat the new mantle on top of it, this meant I could screw the thin base into the mantle from underneath and voila, no more warping.

Here's the finished look. You can se the thinner length of wood just underneath the mantle - should have thought of that in the first place.


 This one shows the finials. I made four in the shape I wanted and then glued and clamped them together in pairs. You can just see the glue seam in this one as I obviously didn't do a very good job of cleaning the glue off and glue doesn't stain.


Monday, 27 January 2014

Building with pallets and reclaimed wood.

I'm kind of in love with the 'Ana White' web site, so many free plans there's bound to be something for everyone and I love that they're so adaptable, it's my go to website for inspiration.
This Rustic console table from Pottery Barn caught my eye, as it did for many others so I had to have a go at building it myself with my reclaimed pallet wood

Pottery Barn Rustic Console table.


The plans I followed are here

While my interpretation may not be quite as catalogue ready as something from Pottery Barn I'm still quite thrilled with how it turned out, especially considering the pallet wood I used needed a heap of planing and sanding to make it useable.
The perfect place for my 'Charlie Bear' Wosley to sit. The pallet wood 'Welcome' sign, scrap wood 'Home' blocks and the scrap wood lamp were all past projects of mine - click on the links to go to them.

alt="pallet wood, DIY furniture, Wood console table, DIY"
Rustic console table using scrap pallet wood

alt=" DIY console table, Pallet wood, Wood furniture, DIY table"
Pallet wood sideboard


alt="Wood table, DIY, Pallet wood, Scrap wood, Woodworking, Sideboard"
Pallet wood furniture


Sharing at

Under the table and dreaming
The dedicated house 
Savvy southern style

Friday, 3 January 2014

Pallet wood sign

I came across this 'Welcome' sign late last year while browsing the tinterweb for inspiration and finally managed to get my own pallet wood version finished just before xmas.

This is my inspiration found on 'Three Mango Seeds' blog





Here's my version of it


It was pretty easy to do, the hardest part getting my 45 degree corners to actually be true, in fact despite my every effort I couldn't then true and so I had to put the brass corners on to help hide the obvious gaps.
I ended up having to do the writing completely free hand because the lettering I had printed out was either way too small or way too big and I was too lazy to trudge all the way back to the house to reprint them.
All of the wood used for this project is pallet wood from the stacks of them we dismantled last year.


Shared at:
Tillys Nest 
Handy Man, Crafty Woman 
Under the table and dreaming

Sunday, 29 December 2013

Christmas decorations & pallet wood

Oh my has it really been a couple of months since I last posted! It hasn't been a conscious thing - my other 2 blogs have suffered as well because a) there's nothing doing in the garden and b) who can lose weight and stay fit at this time of year!

I have been busy building xmas decorations though and my favourite thing has to be this wreath I made from garden willow.


Despite it being the first one I ever made it was surprisingly easy to make. The willow was snipped off from the garden trees and i just kept weaving it round and round until it was fairly thick and sturdy. It was a devil to get going but that was the hardest bit!
I made the flowers using some old red organza type fabric and some cream shower curtain material I bought ages ago. The tutorial for these flowers is all over the net so I won't share it here but instead of using a needle and thread or hot glue as I went I used 'Fixsall' glue.
I then used the 'Fixsall' to stick the flowers to the wreath and added some fake cones and greenery using wire. The hanging bow was just as simple and I love the finished effect.

I also made this xmas mantle planter.

I made the planter from salvaged pallet wood, gave it some stain and a coat of satin varnish and then added some olde world style handles to each end. The inside was filled with greenery from the garden Firs, a few cones and baubles, candles and xmas lights run through it. I'm already looking for spring ideas for the planter.


Shared at:
Tip Junkie

Saturday, 12 October 2013

DIY Adirondack chair.

Usually when I build something I devise a plan in my head of what I want the finished item to look like and then I pretty much make it up as I go along, it's just the way I've always been - I've never built anything from plans! Until now that is.

I've wanted to build an Adirondack chair for ages but just haven't had enough scrap wood to even make a start so when hubby had all those pallets delivered I was adding up the projects I could do as I was ripping them apart.
My pallet wood pile is precious to me though so I made the decision to make the chair following plans I found online on the Anna White website.
I have mixed feelings about these plans because while it helped immensely to have the guesswork taken out of dimensions and angles etc I found alot of the measurements inaccurate for the size of wood that was suggested to use. Most of the issues were easy enough to work round but the finished look isn't as per the diagram because I had to use a 2" piece of wood as a back slat instead of the 4" the plans stated - this is because the width of the back support is 19.5" yet the plans tell you to use five 4" slats and secure them to the 19.5" batten leaving a 0.5" gap in between, this totals 21" NOT the 19.5" that the plans state. There were a couple more discrepancies like this and had I been more experienced I would have noticed this before starting but I didn't! The finished chair still looks awesome though especially when you take into account that the wood cost me nothing more than time taking the pallets apart - all I have to do now is decide on a colour.

Adirondack chair, DIY, Pallet wood, Adirondack, Garden furniture

 Garden furniture, DIY garden, adirondack furniture, chair


 adirondack chair, garden DIY, pallet wood

I'm currently making the matching footstool via the same website but I'm having the same issue with inaccurate measurements. The length of the footstool is 23.5" and yet the plans require you to use six 4" slats with the 0.5" gap in between - this totals 27.5" NOT 23.5" so I'm yet again left with a 2" slat at the bottom.
I've checked the website and everyone else that has made the same chair appears to have been able to use the stated amount and sizes of wood so maybe I am doing something wrong, I just can't igure out what.

Wednesday, 2 October 2013

Winter = Crafting time!

My poor blog! It must be feeling very unloved right now, my posts throughout the entire year have been hit and miss but it's not because I no longer care for this, my first ever blog, it's simply because I have spent so much time outside gardening that I haven't gotten around to crafting or creating as much as I would like, however with the changing of the seasons comes a shift from working outside to working inside.
It won't be long before the garden is all wrapped up for winter and my winter craft projects will take up my time instead. With that thought in mind I have a list ready with a few projects to get me going and no doubt more will follow as I go along.

I ran out of scrap wood earlier in the year - yes, I can hear that intake of breath, what is a girl supposed to do when her wood supply runs out and her whole ethos is crafting on a budget which doesn't allow for buying new wood in?
Well first off she moans to her hubby about the dire situation, give him time to mull it over in his head and wait for his solutions.
My hubbys solution came in the form of this




At first I thought he was taking the proverbial, I mean we all know how difficult these things are to take apart right?
Not to be out palleted I scoured the tinterweb for a solution and came up with this - though it really grated to have to buy something to dismantle free pallets I knew I wouldn't be getting anywhere without one.



I think the whole thing including shipping came in at around £63 but it's the most amazing tool for dismantling pallets and really does work as it says it should.
There are some pallets it won't work on for various reasons but it does the majority of pallets and the wood isn't annihilated so it's all reuseable.
Just 6 or so of the 6ft pallets has given me this little stack to work with


I have all the 3"x1" spacers on a separate pile too - all reusable.

So what am I going to make with my first heap of wood? Well I'm finally going to get a bookcase I really need for the lounge and all my lovely books are finally going to have their own permanent home instead of being dumped in the spare room - so this is one of my first projects

Cannot find the original website.

With Christmas just around the corner I just have to make this to sit on the dining room mantle

Roof Above Us
But it doesn't end there, just 5 mins on Pinterest searching Palletwood or scrapwood projects and you're hit with a veritable minefield of images. Here's some more favourites of mine that may well have to become personal projects



Cannot find where this image originated from but I would love to make this clock for both indoors and outdoors.


I'm not sure where I would put this sign from 'Three Mango Seeds' but I still want it!


So simple and yet so stunning, I love this christmas tree from 'The Wood Connection Blog'


And how about this from 'Shanty 2 Chic', it could be used as a Christmas sign holder in the winter and a hanging basket holder during the summer



Yes I think it's fair to say that I will soon be back on track with regular posts, not only will I be creating with pallet wood but I also have plenty of Christmas gifts to be getting on with.
Roll on winter!

Monday, 24 June 2013

Garden whimsy bird bath

I would never have described myself as a lover of whimsy in the garden, in fact I would go so far as to say that I found alot of whimsy 'tacky'. So you can imagine my own surprise when I decided to make a bird bath for the garden using coloured glass vases and bowls - hubby was certainly sceptical.
I wasn't entirely sure that this new whimsy garden feature would even make it to the actual garden but I have to say both hubby and I are kind of delighted at just how cute it looks nestled in among the pot plants. (apologies for the copyright on my garden blog name).


Cute huh? And yet so easy to make.
This used just 4 pieces of glass - the glass plate for the base, 2 glass vases and 1 glass bowl.
The base of the first vase was glued to the plate using clear silicon sealant then the second vase was glued to the first upside down and finally the bowl was glued to what was the base of the second vase.
It was all left to set for a good 48 hours or so and voila, a bird bath that actually gets used by birds!



What's more is that I'm so loving 'whimsy' that I'm now planning on making even more of it for the garden. These are the kind of things I'm thinking of


All I need for this one is some table legs and some fan blades - hmmmmmm!
http://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/LucyDesignsonline

My garden hose already looks like this anyway so it shouldn't be too much of a stretch to achieve this

http://dirtgarden.wordpress.com/

I absolutely love this, we all have old rusty tools laying around don't we ........oh, just me then!

http://www.empressofdirt.net/garden-art-made-from-old-tools/

I had a go at making something like this today, let's just say it's not as easy at it looks

https://www.bronzefroggallery.com/

Saturday, 18 May 2013

Free online blogging class + FREE 1 years web hosting worth $84

{FREE} 4-Week Profitable Blogging For Beginners Class



Interested in monetising your blog but not sure where to start? then perhaps you might want to consider taking part in Blogelinas FREE 4 week online blogging class. Here's what is on offer for FREE
  • A class manual – packed with 60 pages of information that will help take the overwhelming out of starting your own blog
  • 4 weekly online class sessions where you can ask your questions and get personalized feedback
  • A FREE year of web hosting. Blogelina is able to provide each person who registers for Blogelina’s Online Class complimentary year of web hosting ($84 value)! That’s right – no strings attached, no hidden requirements
  • Blueprints, step-by-step tutorials, networking with other bloggers - Everything you need to grow your blog.
  • Save yourself a lot of time, trouble, and money – learn from my own experiences what to do and not to do.
We all like a no strings attached freebie right, so if you fancy taking part in this popular online class for FREE - even if it's simply for curiositys sake - then click any of the links within this post and sign up. Simples!

{FREE} 4-Week Profitable Blogging For Beginners Class

Friday, 19 April 2013

Toaster holder

I don't remember where I first found this idea as it was a day when I was scouring the net for inspiration. I didn't really take much notice of the idea at first but it must have settled itself somewhere in the part of my brain that actually functions and quite literally from nowhere it suddenly made sense to make one.
It's a simple idea for a tray to hold the toaster so that all those annoying crumbs don't settle all over the worktop and inside the cupboard that houses it.
It was so simple to make from scrap wood.

I cut a square of ply measuring 13" x 13" (I measured the base of my toaster first) and gave it a quick sand.


Next I added some 1" x1" scrap wood all round the base - glued and screwed.


Then I added scrapwood to the sides - glued and screwed - and used a Jigsaw to shape two of the edges and add a handle hole to the same two edges.



I gave it a quick sand down and left it at that. It does the job perfectly - no more crumbs.